SHORTAGE OF SOCIAL SUPPORT IN HIGH SCHOOL ONLINE LEARNING DURING COVID-19

Published in Peer-Reviewed Journal International Journal of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences Studies

IMG_7700_edited.jpg

Abstract: After the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic, many schools in the United States adopted some form of online learning. To measure the impact that different education frameworks have had on high school students’ academic performance, educational satisfaction, and social support, an online survey was distributed to 302 students at a public high school located in a suburban area of Eastern Shore. Data were analyzed through ANOVA, which found > 95% significant differences in questions regarding participation and interaction with teachers and peers. On the other hand, no significant difference was found among questions regarding educational satisfaction. The study finds that most students who received an in-person education felt more supported and comfortable with their classmates and teachers. In addition, some online students preferred in-person learning yet alternatively choose online learning due to COVID-19 concerns. Based on these findings, schools may encourage students to participate in in-person learning by making school a safer place through various safety arrangements. Schools unable to host in-person learning due to major COVID concerns should utilize strategies, such as break-out rooms to promote sharing and discussion, to increase communication and interaction between students in online courses.